With over 90 percent of the ballots counted, far-right candidate Jair Bolsonaro wins the first round with 46,3 percent of the vote but fails to reach the 50 percent necessary for getting elected the new president of Brazil on the first round. Fernando Haddad of the PT who got 28,9 percent is now in second place and will face Bolsonaro in the second round on October 28.

Fernando Haddad from the Workers Party (PT) will face far-right Jair Bolsonaro from the Social Liberal Party (PSL) in the second round of the presidential elections, Oct. 28.

The abstention rate more than 20 percent according to the official estimate, while GloboNews reported that 39 percent of people abstained in total. Voting is mandatory in Brazil.

Haddad, in his first speech after the vote, thanked the party and the voters, but warning that Brazil could face another episode of dictatorship, encouraging the voters to take the opportunity of maintaining democracy and social justice for the second round. He also repeated his commitment to a pacific and respectful campaign, using “arguments” as only “weapons.”

The President of the Electoral Tribunal called the vote a “celebration of democracy.”

Jair Bolsonaro has been criticized nationally and internationally for his authoritarian, sexist, racist, homophobic and fascist comments and behavior. His running-mate Mourao, a retired general, has suggested a military coup is possible in Brazil.

Speaking at an event in Brasilia and referring to Lula, Mourao said either the judicial system removes from politics “those elements involved in all those illicit acts” or the army would “impose” its will.

He added that “very well elaborated plans” for a military intervention had already been developed.

Both Mourao and Bolsonaro have repeatedly praised Brazil’s military dictatorship (1964-1985), which tortured, forcibly disappeared and murdered thousands of people.


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