Violence erupted between fans in the Plaza de la Democracia, in San José, during the 2014 World Cup game against the Netherlands.
Violence erupted between fans in the Plaza de la Democracia, in San José, during the 2014 World Cup game against the Netherlands.

COSTA RICA NEWS – Costa Rica’s  Unión de Clubes de Fútbol de la Primera División (UNAFUT) – Soccer Clubs Federation – and the  Ministerio de Seguridad Publica (MSP) are joining efforts to prevent violence both inside and outside stadiums during the Campionato de Invierno (Winter League), which begins on August 17.

Deportivo Saprissa, Liga Deportiva Alajuelense and Club Sport Herediano, the three clubs with the largest fan bases in the country, already have developed strategies to prevent fights.

Alajuelense and Herediano will monitor the access of barras (soccer hooligans) while Deportivo Saprissa is testing an automated fingerprint identification system similar to the one used by the Argentine Soccer Association (AFA).

“We want to be aware of all people entering the southern stands, where the barras stay,” José Pablo García, Saprissa’s media relations officer, said. “Only those who are registered will be able to access that area. This way, if problems or improper behavior arise, those responsible will be banned.”

These measures are aligned with the recently approved Ley para la Prevención y Sanción de la Violencia en Eventos Deportivos (Law for the Prevention and Penalizing of Violence at Sporting Events), which came into effect in February.

A soccer match between Costa Rica’s Liga Deportiva Alajuelense and Club Sport Cartaginés was suspended on Feb. 16 because of fighting between the teams’ barras (soccer hooligans). Fifty-four fans were arrested because of the fracas, according to officials.
A soccer match between Costa Rica’s Liga Deportiva Alajuelense and Club Sport Cartaginés was suspended on Feb. 16 because of fighting between the teams’ barras (soccer hooligans). Fifty-four fans were arrested because of the fracas, according to officials.

The new law establishes the creation of the Security Information System at Sporting Events (SISED) and a photographic record of fans. The information can be used by law enforcement and private security companies to prevent fans reported as troublemakers from accessing sporting events, according to the Public Safety Ministry.

Saprissa’s records already have 2,000 names, and the number is expected to increase when the Winter League matches kick off in August, García said.

“We have five fingerprint readers and cameras monitoring the entire stadium, totaling an investment of US$100,000,” García said.

Liga Deportiva Alajuelense will take similar measures in their stadiums, but the club didn’t reveal when it will start their implementation.

Starting this season, fans also will count on reporting centres set up by the MSP inside all the stadiums in the event they are subjected to any incident that puts their safety at risk.

“These reporting centres will each have a law enforcement attorney and a statistical analyst,” Freddy Guillén, head Law Enforcement Plans and Operations, said.

The new law was created after a Feb.16 match between Liga Deportiva Alajuelense and Club Sport Cartaginés was suspended because of clashes between the barras of both teams. Fifty-four fans were arrested because of the fracass, according to officials.

Violence rates in the country increase with every soccer match, according to the MSP.

“When there is a local game, some people are enjoying it and celebrating, but those on the losing end become very frustrated, which can lead to violence, especially when you add alcohol consumption to the mix,” Alejandra Mora, executive president of the Instituto Nacional de Mujeres (INAMU) – the National Women’s Institute – said.

During Costa Rica’s matches in the 2014 FIFA World Cup, the 911 system reported an increase in calls of inter-family abuse of up to 200%. After the game against Greece on June 29, there were 800 reports.

“Alcohol plays a major role here,” José Carlos Chinchillas, a sociologist at Costa Rica’s Universidad Nacional (UNA), said. “When people consume alcohol or any other type of drug, they stop following social norms and, if we add to this a state of collective euphoria, the way in which we relate to others gets out of control.”

The INAMU launched in June a series of campaigns that aim to eliminate sports-related violence, in particular those cases involving women and children. The campaigns encourage the public to report incidents confidentially by dialing 911.

Source: Infosurehoy