Violence, forced displacement and impunity is overwhelming the women of Honduras, the National Commissioner for Human Rights Roberto Herrera recognized on the eve of the “Honduran Women’s Day,” which is celebrated annually on Jan. 25.

Between 2012 and 2018 about 6,142 Honduran women lost their lives in violent circumstances. More than 90% of femicides “remains unpunished for lack of investigation,” Herrera said in a statement, adding that about 350 women died violently in 2018.

Honduras marks Women’s Day on Jan. 25 in remembrance of the first significant achievement in women’s political rights. On Jan. 25, 1955, President Julio Lozano Diaz recognized the right of women to vote in elections, which facilitated the expansion of women’s field of action into the public sphere.

In 2016 and 2017, Herrera presided over 20,398 complaints, at the national level, about human rights violations, of which about 40% were filed by women.

Of the 8,110 complaints filed by women, 3,053 are related to the right to life and personal integrity, which include death threats, intimidation, domestic and intrafamily violence, among other crimes.

Between January and September of 2018, the National Commissioner for Human Rights addressed 2,206 complaints filed by women, of which about 790 are related to the right to life and personal integrity.

Currently, according to official data, 14% of women who have basic education are at risk, while 17% are victims of displacement.

Regarding Honduran women with a university education, 30% of that demographic are at risk, while 23% have already been displaced.

The Ombudsman report adds that, regarding occupational hazards, 43% of Honduran housewives are affected by different forms of violence, followed by women working in trades with 16%, and teachers with 9%.

 


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