With clear skies over most of Costa Rica, the total eclipse of the moon Sunday night was something that couldn’t be missed.

Before the show

It couldn’t have been a more perfect night.

From my front yard (and back) in Santa Ana I had the perfect seat from my lawn chair.

Camera ready. Covered up from the cold winds. Let the show begin.

 

Looking east to the skies over San Jose. Time-lapse photo, I was impressed

I could see the clouds over the hill to the east, lit up by the lights of the big city (San Jose). A few times I thought the show was going to be bust, but the strong winds scattered the clouds and never obstructed the view.

 

 

First look

My mind went to the time when I was younger, much younger, sitting, looking up in the Planetarium at the Ontario Science Centre (the canuck spelling for center) and more recently in Medellin, Colombia, in the Planetario de Medellín Jesús Emilio Ramírez.

 

 

Getting there

The phenomenon started around 9:30 pm when you could see with the naked eye a piece of the Moon being bitten off. As time passed more and more of the Moon was getting covered, until its total red tonality – when it became a complete dark orange spot in the sky – surrounded by dozens of bright stars.

 

Almost

I had my camera pointed at the point in the tiny screen. The results nothing like the pictures already being posted online on Twitter and Facebook. But they were my pictures, crappy and all.

I’m done. Next time a better camera

Once the Moon was in full eclipse it was time to head inside, out of the cold and the howling winds.

What I could see with my eyes, but couldn’t pick it up with my camera. Foto: Alonso Tenorio

When I moved here last year it was great to have the wind turbines as neighbors. Last night was a perfect example as to why ICE chose this ‘cerro’ (peak). No question great minds (not mine) at work there.

I had every intention to see the reverse, the uneclipse? But the couch and whatever was on tv at the time got the better of me. It was 4 am already. And although there was no electricity in the barrio, it wasn’t the dark: the full moon (with clear skies) lit up the morning for me.

Now, before you ask what’s the big deal, consider this, you may have only four or five opportunities in a lifetime to witness the phenomenon. Since I have already probably used up all of them, this could be my last opportunity and didn’t want to miss it.

What was your experience with the lunar eclipse? Post your comments below or to the Q’s official Facebook page.

 


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