Recent decisions by President Luis Guillermo Solís has led to raised concerns by opposition, who feel the President is testing the waters for more controversial issues.

Otto Guevara, former presidential candidate, and leader of the Movimiento Libertario party leads the group of legislators concerned about the President's recent decisions.
Otto Guevara, former presidential candidate, and leader of the Movimiento Libertario party leads the group of legislators concerned about the President’s recent decisions.

A group of opposition legislators, led by former presidential candidate, Otto Guevara, are alleging the President is flexing laws and the Constitution in favor of interests of the government, regardless of the legality and are asking the Solís to be more consistent with his campaign promises not to twist the law.

A example cited by the legislators are the recent veto of former President Oscar Arias, who in 2009 prohibited the artisans of Calle 13a in San José for the use of public road for their use. Last week Solís gave the road to the group of small merchants with his overturning of the veto and defying the municipality of San José.

Legislators fee that Solís is using this situation to measure the reaction of the opposition in the Legislature and more importantly, whether the Constitutional Court will allow him in the future to eliminate other more controversial vetoes.

One such could the veto by former President Laura Chinchilla on labour justice reform. An overturn of the veto by Solís would permit strikes in essential public service, including police and hospitals.

Another decision concerning legislators is the keeping on as Ministro de la Presidencia, Melvin Jiménez. The President is being accused of ignoring a ruling by the Attorney General, declaring unconstitutional the appointment of Jiménez, a Bishop of the Lutheran Church and a public official. Costa Rica has always been clear on being a secular state.

On this issue, Solís has refused to replace his Jiménez, whose position is akin to the Chief of Staff in US politics, merely stating that he awaits the outcome of the Constitutional Court.

However, during the presidential campaign earlier this year, Solís said the he would respect any decision of the Attorney General. And on this alone legislators are calling for the removal of Jiménez.

This week, President Solís is expected to give his report on his first 100 days in office.

Source: La Repubblica