Friday 25 June 2021

Bolivia Raises Coca Cultivation Limits, Widens Legal Supply-Demand Gap

“Coca” is used ancestrally in Bolivia for chewing to combat fatigue, in tea infusions to mitigate altitude sickness or in indigenous rituals for the riddle of the future. When it is processed chemically it becomes drug, a substance punished by the authorities. (REUTERS / David Mercado).

(Q24N / Insightcrime.org) Bolivia’s government has agreed to raise permitted levels of legal coca production after violent protests by farmers, in a move that exacerbates the flaw in the country’s otherwise largely successful coca policy: the gap between legal production and legal consumption.

On February 23, the Bolivian government and coca farmers came to an agreement for the country’s planned new coca law to allow 22,000 hectares of coca to be legally planted each year, reported La Razon.

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The accord brought an end to weeks of violent protests by coca farmers against the law and its initial provision for 20,000 hectares of legal production. Under the terms of the current law, dating from 1986, only 12,000 hectares are allowed to supply Bolivia’s legal coca market.

Riot policemen launch tears gas canisters during clashes with coca growers from Yungas in La Paz, Bolivia February 21, 2017.REUTERS/David Mercado

The new law not only regulates the quantity of coca cultivations legally allowed in Bolivia, it also aims to create new mechanisms for the state to regulate production, distribution, sales, industrialization and exportation of Bolivian coca. Following the agreement with the coca farmers, the house of deputies approved the bill, which will now move to the senate, reported La Razon.

InSight Crime Analysis

Bolivia’s coca bill aims to enshrine in law the policies of former coca farmer and current president Evo Morales, who has favoured engagement with rather than repression of coca farmers.

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Women protect themselves from tear gas during clashes of coca growers from Yungas with riot policemen in La Paz, Bolivia, February 21, 2017.REUTERS/David Mercado

The policy has largely served the Morales government well. While Bolivia’s neighbors Colombia and Peru have seen coca cultivation levels rise and fall amid the push and pull of forced eradication efforts, farmers and drug traffickers, Bolivia has seen a gradual but steady decrease since 2010, at least according to the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) figures.

However, the debate over legal limits to coca cultivation goes to the heart of the one major problem Morales’ policies have yet to address: coca production remains substantially higher than the amount of the crop required to satisfy the demand of Bolivia’s legal market. According to a 2013 government study, the legal coca market can be supplied with approximately 14,700 hectares of coca, meaning under the terms of the new law, more than 7,000 hectares worth of coca could find its way to the illegal cocaine market each year.

The coca law also aims to address this through government involvement in the regulation of the entire production chain, encouraging sales, industrialization and even international export. However, the government has long sought out new markets or new uses for coca and has yet to find a way to significantly bridge the legal coca supply-demand gap.

Article originally appeared on Insightcrime.org and is republished here with permission.

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FACT CHECK:
We strive for accuracy in its reports. But if you see something that doesn’t look right, send us an email. The Q reviews and updates its content regularly to ensure it’s accuracy.

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