The Central Bank of Costa Rica (BCCR) denied that ¢1,000 colones noted with a partial detachment of inks are false.

Central Banks admits to a imperfection in the ¢1,000 bills but assured they are not fake

“The ¢1,000 banknotes analyzed were authentic. They correspond to bills that were put into circulation for three years,” confirmed the Central Bank, in a press release, on Thursday (November 28).

In a press release, the BCCR debunked a series of videos and publications on social networks claiming the banknotes are fake.

To determine the authenticity of a ¢1,000 bill, the Central Bank says to use the touch, look and tilt method:

  • Touch the relief on the image of the character and the denomination, as well as the mark for the visually impaired, located in the upper right of the front of the bill
  • Look at the transparent window with the image of the character and the register that forms the number «1».
  • Tilt the bill to see that the coffee leaf and the map of Costa Rica change color from pink to gold.

The Central Bank recommends, in order to prolong the useful life of the banknotes, not to scratch or wrinkle or tear them.

The Central Bank said it is coordinating with the manufacturer to determine the cause.