Thursday 27 January 2022

Ecuador president Moreno leaves Quito amid growing unrest

With protests escalating in Ecuador, President Lenin Moreno has moved his administration out of the capital Quito to the port city of Guayaquil. Moreno claims his predecessor, Rafael Correa, is attempting a coup.

Paying the bills

Latest

4.7 quake wakes up residents of Central Valley

QCOSTARICA - A 4.7-magnitude quake woke up the residents...

5 new infections a minute in 24 hrs

RICO'S COVID DIGEST - Costa Rica broke a new...

San Jose airport was a mess on Wednesday, while omicron cases continue to rise (Photos)

QCOSTARICA - Once again, the Juan Santamaría International -...

Best Canadian Online Casinos for CAD

Players from Canada are often looking for a new...

Tourists who died in a fatal accident had been in the country for five days

QCOSTARICA - The three American tourists who died Monday...

US Travel Advisory: DO NOT Travel To Costa Rica

QCOSTARICA - Can a US citizen travel to Costa...
Paying the bills

Share

As thousands of anti-government protesters poured into Ecuador’s capital Quito, the nation’s president, Lenin Moreno, moved to the southern port city of Guayaquil and announced he was facing an attempted coup.

Nationwide protests, including road blocks, looting and escalating clashes, first started earlier this week in response to the government’s decision to cancel key fuel subsidies.

- Advertisement -

Members of the nation’s indigenous tribes traveled to the city for a march on the Quito presidential palace on Tuesday. Protesters braved police tear gas and some briefly broke into the empty congress building, while elsewhere roads were blocked and transport came to a halt.

Protesters seized two oil installations and state oil company Petroecuador warned that one-third of the country’s production could be lost if protests continue.

In other parts of the Andean country, protesters vandalized shops and vehicles during running street battles with riot police.

Moreno blames Correa, Maduro

In a Monday evening address from Guayaquil, Moreno pledged to stick to the subsidies decision. Moreno also accused his exiled predecessor Rafael Correa of trying to oust him with help from Venezuela’s Nicolas Maduro.

“Maduro and Correa have begun their destabilization plan,” Moreno said, appearing together with his top military chiefs.

- Advertisement -

On Tuesday, his government said it would be open to mediation by the United Nation or the Catholic Church to overcome the crisis. Moreno’s secretary, Juan Roldan, also said that 570 people have been arrested due to the protests.

Correa slams ‘liars’ in Moreno’s government

Talking to reporters in Belgium, Correa denied accusations that he was planning a coup and that he was in cahoots with Venezuela’s Maduro.

“They are such liars … They say I am so powerful that with an iPhone from Brussels I could lead the protests,” he told the Reuters news agency.

“People couldn’t take it anymore, that’s the reality,” he added.

Ex-president Rafael Correa now lives in Belgium
- Advertisement -

Correa faces multiple charges in Ecuador, including corruption and abuse of power. He said he would only go back if there was a political shift in the country.

“I would have to be a candidate for something, for example, vice president,” he said.

IMF demands austerity

Ecuador is facing an economic crisis and was forced to seek a $4.2-billion (€3.8 billion) loan from the International Monetary Fund (IMF) last year. The canceling of the fuel subsides plays a key role in complying with the IMF’s terms.

However, Moreno’s austerity program is unpopular among his voters, says Ximena Zapata of the Hamburg-based GIGA Institute for Latin American Studies.

“It punishes the poorest parts of the population and favors the small percentage of the wealthy, mostly private banks and businesspeople,” she told DW.

- Advertisement -
Paying the bills

Related Articles

Avianca Announces Seven New Routes As It Continues Rapid Growth

Q TRAVEL (Routes) The strongest air network in Colombia and one...

Why doesn’t it snow in South America? (or at least in very few places)

Q REPORTS - As autumn ends, a white breeze begins to...

Subscribe to our stories

To be updated with all the latest news, offers and special announcements.

Log In

Forgot password?

Forgot password?

Enter your account data and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Your password reset link appears to be invalid or expired.

Log in

Privacy Policy

Add to Collection

No Collections

Here you'll find all collections you've created before.