Saturday, 6 June 2020

I’ll be Back’: Morales Builds Opposition & Prepares MAS for Bolivian Vote

Former Bolivian President Evo Morales has not given up his political activity after fleeing the country. Argentine political analyst Gonzalo Fiore Viani has explained how Buenos Aires sees Morales’ attempts to maintain control over the situation in Bolivia and how the Fernandez government could mediate tensions in the country.

Evo Morales

“I’ll be back,” ousted Bolivian leader Evo Morales told Reuters before Christmas, pledging to return to the country in a year. He is currently residing in Argentina where he moved from Mexico being granted political asylum by the new government of Alberto Fernandez.

On December 19, 2019, the Argentine president announced that Buenos Aires “will not hand over for any reason” Morales after the Bolivian Prosecutor’s Office sent the former president an arrest warrant, accusing him of sedition and terrorism.

- paying the bills -

Jeanine Anez, who took the reins of the Bolivian government after Evo Morales had been expelled by the military and right-wing opposition in November, has repeatedly accused the former president of plotting unrest from exile.
Morales Stepping Up Political Activism in Argentina

Being forced to resign on November 10, Morales immediately went to Mexico, the first that granted him asylum. However, on December 12, the former Bolivian president left for Argentina, where he “felt more comfortable”, according to Argentina’s Foreign Minister Felipe Sola.

The asylum provided by Buenos Aires to Morales didn’t come without strings: Sola specified that the Argentine government does not want Evo Morales nor any other refugees to use the country as a staging ground for political activity, and advised against making public statements.

However, the very next day, the former Bolivian leader issued a harsh statement on Twitter lambasting the Anez government for what he called the aim to privatize and sell out the country’s strategic companies to transnational corporations.

 

- paying the bills -
- paying the bills -
Q24N
Q24N
Q24N is an aggregator of news for Latin America. Reports from Mexico to the tip of Chile and Caribbean are sourced for our readers to find all their Latin America news in one place.

Related Articles

Food banks are a lifeline for Mexico’s needy, and never more than during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Every Friday, early in the morning, Arsenia Cortes packs two huge...

In Argentina, Covid-19 numbers rise to over 15 thousand cases

(Prensa Latina/Q Costa Rica) With more than 717 new cases, the...

MOST READ

Brazil exceeds 30,000 deaths and sets new record for infections

(AFP) Brazil recorded another record of COVID-19 deaths in the last 24 hours: 1,262, bringing the total death toll to 31,309 (June 3). The Ministry...

One Cuban Family’s Long And Risky Journey To A New Life In The U.S.

Currently, there are almost 2,000 migrants in Panama shelters from Cuba, Haiti, Bangladesh, Nepal, Congo, Cameroon and India, after crossing the border from Colombia...

Services and products would cost more in July

(QCOSTARICA) Tighten the purse strings, come July we can expect to pay more for rice, bread, beans, the pet products and even to buy...

Back on the beach!

Michele Simmons posted this photo on social media of her first boat trip back at work on The Bibanga Yacht!!! ....Fabulous morning on the beach...

Why doesn’t Costa Rica join Panama?

Rico's Digest - As many of you who follow me know I am an avid reader of Quora. I enjoy the daily digest that...

Up to 10 years in prison for abandonment of seniors

Legislators on Tuesday approved in first debate a bill that will penalize up to 10 years in prison for the abandonment of seniors. The initiative,...

Let's Keep This Going!

To be updated with all the latest news and information about Costa Rica and Latin America.