Wednesday, 30 September 2020

It’s Been 80 Years Since Costa Rica Had An Indigenous Person On Its Banknotes

The last one was in 1939 and it is believed that it was the Talamanqueño king Antonio Saldaña

It’s been 80 years since Costa Rica had an indigenous person on its new banknotes. The last being in 1939, and believed that it was the Talamanqueño king Antonio Saldaña

The note was issued by the Banco Nacional in 1939

The banknote was issued by the Banco Nacional, a 10 Colones note when the national bank was responsible for printing our money.

In fact, the Banco Central de Costa Rica (Central Bank of Costa Rica), which has printed our silver since 1950, never used any “Indio” in the colon since then and to date.
On the back of that 10-colones bill, from the F series, a “cacique Indio de Costa Rica” (Indian chief of Costa Rica) appeared from the waist up of the “billetico”. In the front was the priest Florencio del Castillo.
- paying the bills -


In a book published by Museums of Costa Rica, in 2014, it is explained that the illustration of that chief was made with great influences from a drawing by the Spanish artist Tomás Povedano, who lived in Costa Rica.

The Indio of Povedano’s drawing is called “cacique huetar”, it was published in the Historical Book of Costa Rica (between 1909 and 1937) and is said to be the last king of Talamanca, named Antonio Saldaña.

In fact, the illustrations of Povedano and that on the 10-colones note are almost identical to those of Saldaña in a photograph.

Two years later, in 1941, the same Banco Nacional issued another, two colones and E-series, which had an illustration on the back based on another painting by Povedano called “El rescate de Dulcehe” (The Rescue of Dulcehe).

The princess Dulcehe featured on Costa Rica’s banknote

- paying the bills -

The Spanish conqueror Juan Vásquez de Coronado appears on the front of that banknote.

Dulcehe was an indigenous princess in 1560, she was the sister of the chief of the Quepo Indians, called Corrohore, and who lived in the southern part of Costa Rica.

Dulcehe was captured by the Coto Indians, who had quarrels with the Quepo. That motivated Juan Vásquez de Coronado, who took issue with the quepo, to invade the lands of the preserve until the princess was rescued.

Currently, different pre-Columbian archaeological pieces, pieces of jewelry, kitchen or a ceremonial altar appear on the security stamps, however, an indigenous face does not.

Víctor Mena, a Costa Rican Indian Huetar sees as “a great failure of our rulers, the absence of our culture, of our people and leaders. Let’s not talk about presenting a great chief, let’s talk about presenting the indigenous culture, something that has never been done. It is a great debt because we have plenty of culture and representatives that can decorate a bill. ”

 

- paying the bills --

 

 

 

Rico
Ricohttp://www.theqmedia.com
"Rico" is the crazy mind behind the Q media websites, a series of online magazines where everything is Q! In these times of new normal, stay at home. Stay safe. Stay healthy.

Related Articles

Fiscal uncertainty and seasonality influence an increase in the dollar exchange

(QCOSTARICA) The dollar exchange rate has maintained an upward trend for...

Ruta 27 tolls will increase starting Thursday

(QCOSTARICA) While the economic crisis felt by one and all due...

MOST READ

Costa Rica aspires to have 25% of the electric vehicle fleet within 15 years

(QCOSTARICA) A total 1,191 electric cars circulate on the roads of our cities, coasts and mountains. That number is negligible among the more than...

When will tourists from more US destinations be allowed? This is what the ICT says

(QCOSTARICA) One of the main connection points between Costa Rica and the United States is the state of Florida. However, that state is still...

A Tarnished Peace in Latin America

It is with pride that we speak of peace in Latin America The long civil war in Colombia has been settled after twenty years...

Fiscal uncertainty and seasonality influence an increase in the dollar exchange

(QCOSTARICA) The dollar exchange rate has maintained an upward trend for the past two weeks, since September 14, increasing ¢9.11 colones. Between the 14th and...

COVID-19 in Costa Rica: drop in new cases daily, Health allows use of antigen tests

(QCOSTARICA) It was good to see Health Minister, Dr. Daniel Salas, back at the helm, after being absent for more than week. The Minister reported...

Why is the ‘Aguila’ on its head? The marketing idea that confused Costa Ricans

(QCOSTARICA) You may or may not have noticed by the 'aguila', the iconic eagle logo of the Imperial beer brand, has been seen with...

Let's Keep This Going!

To be updated with all the latest news and information about Costa Rica and Latin America.

Log In

Forgot password?

Forgot password?

Enter your account data and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Your password reset link appears to be invalid or expired.

Log in

Privacy Policy

Add to Collection

No Collections

Here you'll find all collections you've created before.