While taking part in the Marcha de la Diversida (Gay Pride March) in downtown San Jose Sunday afternoon, Costa Rica president Carlos Alvarado Quesada, rejected the comparisons with the dictators in Nicaragua and Venezuela; Daniel Ortega and Nicolás Maduro, respectively.

President Carlos Alvarado with his wife Claudia Dobles (in yellow) to his right took part in Sunday’s Marcha de la Diversidad (Gay Pride March)in downtown San Jose

The prez also rejected the criticism of legislators accusing of exceeding his powers and limiting the work of the Executive Power.

“I don’t know. I could not see Don Ortega or Mr. Maduro here, particularly in a march like today (…),” Alvarado said with a laugh.

Relations between Casa Presidencial and the Legislative Assembly tensed at the end of the week after Alvarado complained of legislators not endorsing the creation of two posts contained in his budget proposal, for a manager of the National Council of Concessions (CNC) and for another for phytosanitary personnel that is required to protect the country’s borders.

The president stressed the two positions would not increase spending for the year.

According to the president, in addition to “going too far, legislators are preventing the work of his administration and of wanting to administer in matters that only concern the Executive Power”.

“I believe that, once again, there is an excess of the Legislative Power, which cannot administer (the executive branch). They have to do the tax matters, oversee … I draw attention to this because I do believe that there is an overreach, that goes against the efficiency of the country,” accused the President.

Last week Alvarado also criticized the way in which the legislators carry out their work, including criticized them for failing to give substantive arguments to oppose the re-election of Constitutional Court magistrate Paul Rueda.

“I raise my concern about what is happening in Congress … I am respectful of the division of powers, however, my concern is also that of the people … There is a history of this matter,” Alvarado said Thursday in his weekly press conference.

In Nicaragua, elected president Daniel Ortega has been accused of being a dictator in the face of the socio-political rising in that country occuring in April 2018 and his response of repression that resulted in more than 300 deaths and hundres of policial prisoners and today having a stronghold on the country’s legislative, judicial and excutive branches.

In Venezuela, Nicola’s Maduro re-election as president has been questioned by the legitimate democratically appointed opposition in the legislative assembly, who is calling for Maduro to step down and hold new elections.