Thursday 23 September 2021

US Navy Hospital Ship to Deploy to Colombia

Paying the bills

Latest

Why the billions in English are not like the billions in Spanish

What amount would you prefer to have saved in...

Health confirms 15 cases of malaria on the border with Nicaragua

QCOSTARICA - An outbreak of 15 people positive for...

Conditions worsen for Haitian migrants on US-Mexico border

Q24N - Conditions are deteriorating in a camp on...

Costa Rica, Panama and Dominican Republic seek a solution for Haiti

QCOSTARICA - Costa Rica President Carlos Alvarado, Luis Abinader...

Mexico finds a Latin American ally in Venezuela’s Maduro

Q24N - The recent summit of the Community of...
Paying the bills

Share

The United States is sending a U.S. Navy hospital ship to Colombia to help treat some of the hundreds of thousands of people who have poured over the border fleeing violence in Venezuela.

Boatswain’s Mate 3rd Class Taryn Armington and Sonar Technician (Surface) Seaman Darian Joseph prepare to cast off mooring lines for the Military Sealift Command hospital ship USNS Comfort.

Defense Secretary Jim Mattis told reporters traveling with him to Washington from Bogata, Colombia, Friday that he would likely be sending the USNS Comfort based at Norfolk, Virginia.

Mattis said those he spoke with in Bogata were “embracing” and “enthusiastic” about the upcoming ship deployment, which he stressed was “absolutely a humanitarian mission.”

- Advertisement -

“We’re not sending soldiers, we’re sending doctors,” Mattis said, without providing details on when the ship would set sail.

Hospital ships are typically deployed to provide life-saving treatment and medical care and to relieve the pressure on national health systems.

The U.S. defense secretary said he was given specific input, such as where best to deploy the ship, during talks Friday with his defense counterpart and newly inaugurated Colombian President Ivan Duque.

“They (Colombian leadership) not only agreed in principle, they gave details of how we might best craft the cruise through the region,” Mattis said.

Chile, Argentina and Brazil — the other stops on his South America tour — also provided input on the hospital ship deployment, according to Mattis.

Aware of Venezuelan sensitivities, Mattis stressed the U.S. hospital ship would not go into Venezuela’s territorial waters.

A Venezuelan woman holds a girl at a health post for migrants in Cucuta, along Colombia’s border with Venezuela, July 16, 2018.
- Advertisement -

Jason Marczak, director of the Adrienne Arsht Latin America Center at the Atlantic Council, told VOA the situation in Venezuela has led to a migration crisis of global proportions “that is on track to potentially parallel or surpass the numbers that (have been) coming out of the Middle East.”

“If those migration numbers are not managed in an orderly, effective way, that has the potential to create greater instability in the countries to which migrants are going,” Marczak said.

As of June, an estimated 2.3 million people had fled Venezuela, mainly to Colombia, Ecuador, Peru and Brazil, according to the United Nations. U.N. officials reported at that time that more than half of those who fled were “suffering from malnourishment.”

The U.S. Navy has one other hospital ship, the USNS Mercy, which is based at San Diego, California.

- Advertisement -

USNS Comfort and USNS Mercy usually deploy for humanitarian missions with a diverse group of doctors on board hailing from multiple countries.

Article originally appeared on Today Colombia and is republished here with permission.

- Advertisement -
Paying the bills
Q24N
Q24N is an aggregator of news for Latin America. Reports from Mexico to the tip of Chile and Caribbean are sourced for our readers to find all their Latin America news in one place.

Related Articles

What are we celebrating?

QCOSTARICA - From the gallows humor department is the following meme...

Covid-19 deaths skyrocket throughout September in Nicaragua

TODAY NICARAGUA – In the past week, a total of 329...

Subscribe to our stories

To be updated with all the latest news, offers and special announcements.

Article originally appeared on Today Colombia and is republished here with permission.

Log In

Forgot password?

Forgot password?

Enter your account data and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Your password reset link appears to be invalid or expired.

Log in

Privacy Policy

Add to Collection

No Collections

Here you'll find all collections you've created before.