Monday, 23 November 2020

Amnesty law sparks fear of whitewash over protest crackdown

(Reuters) – Nicaragua’s government on Friday proposed an amnesty law that would free prisoners detained in protests against President Daniel Ortega, but which opponents fear will also limit scope to investigate the state for its crackdown on demonstrators.

Amnesty Law threatens to imprison political prisoners if they protest again Foto Jader Flores/ LA PRENSA

Demonstrations erupted in April 2018, when Ortega tried to cut welfare benefits, and gradually spread into a broader protest movement against the president’s rule in Nicaragua.

More than 700 people were arrested in demonstrations and 325 mostly opposition protesters died in clashes with security forces, while over 60,000 Nicaraguans have gone into exile due to political strife over the last 14 months, rights groups say.

- Advertisement -

Nicaragua’s opposition has made the release of political prisoners a condition of dialogue with the administration, prompting the government to put forward its amnesty bill.

“Amnesty is granted to those who participated in events throughout the country from April 18, 2018 until the date that this law goes into effect,” says the bill introduced to the Congress dominated by Ortega’s Sandinista party.

The opposition group known as the Civic Alliance criticized the proposed amnesty law, fearing it would impede efforts to secure justice for victims of the crackdown.

Jose Pallais, a spokesman for the group, called the proposal an attempted whitewash that would guarantee “impunity for paramilitaries and police who participated in repression.”

- Advertisement -

The government did not immediately reply to a request for comment on the opposition’s concerns.

Ortega has called the protests an illegal plot by his adversaries to oust him, while critics have accused him of human rights abuses in the response to the dissent.

Families fleeing violence in Central America are part of the flood of people trying to enter the United States via Mexico.

The flow of undocumented immigrants has sparked the threat of a trade war between the United States and Mexico over border security.

Article originally appeared on Today Nicaragua and is republished here with permission.

- Advertisement -
Q24N
Q24N is an aggregator of news for Latin America. Reports from Mexico to the tip of Chile and Caribbean are sourced for our readers to find all their Latin America news in one place.

Related Articles

Nicaragua: A Holiday Season without Flights

TODAY NICARAGUA – Avianca, the Colombian based airline, has unintentionally become...

Ortega no longer has fresh petrodollars from Venezuela. And now what?

TODAY NICARAGUA – Much has been said about Venezuelan cooperation, except...

MOST READ

“Bubbles” burst due to fatigue and crisis

QCOSTARICA - We are tired. The physical and mental exhaustion of the pandemic grows exponentially, added to an economic and social crisis, ended up...

Costa Rica in sugar war with Canada and Brazil

The Costa Rica government's ideological protectionism puts us in trouble and strains the business climate, as the government of Canada and Brazil have brought...

Foreigners driver’s license exemption

QCOSTARICA - The Ministerio de Obras Publicas y Transportes (MOPT) has extended the driving privileges of foreigners non-residents (tourists) who have remained in Costa...

Protesters set fire to the Guatemalan Congress

Q24N - Hundreds of Guatemalans burned Congress headquarters on Saturday in protest at the approval of the budget for 2021, the highest in the...

The Best Mobile Casino Games Ranked In 2020

As the world of online casino games continues to boom in 2020, players across the globe are choosing to head to the web for...

Costa Rica wants to attract foreign pensioners and rentiers

QCOSTARICA - The minimum amount of capital investment that a foreign investor, rentier or pensioner must demonstrate to immigration authorities, as a requirement to...

Let's Keep This Going!

To be updated with all the latest news and information about Costa Rica and Latin America.

Article originally appeared on Today Nicaragua and is republished here with permission.

Log In

Forgot password?

Forgot password?

Enter your account data and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Your password reset link appears to be invalid or expired.

Log in

Privacy Policy

Add to Collection

No Collections

Here you'll find all collections you've created before.