Saturday, 26 September 2020

Brazil’s supreme court votes to make homophobia a crime

RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — Brazil’s supreme court officially made homophobia and transphobia crimes similar to racism on Thursday, with the final justices casting their votes in a ruling that comes amid fears the country’s far-right administration is seeking to roll back LGBT social gains.

FILE – In this Dec. 15, 2018 file photo, same sex couples wait to get married prior to a group marriage of forty same sex couples in Sao Paulo, Brazil. Brazil’s supreme court has officially made homophobia and transphobia crimes similar to racism, with the final justices casting their votes on Thursday, June 13, 2019 in a ruling that comes amid fears the country far-right administration seeks to roll back LGBT social gains. (AP Photo/Nelson Antoine, File)

Six of the Supreme Federal Tribunal’s 11 judges had already voted in favor of the measure in late May, giving the ruling a majority. The final justices voted Thursday for a tally of eight votes for and three against.

Racism was made a crime in Brazil in 1989 with prison sentences of up to five years. The court’s judges ruled that homophobia should be framed within the racism law until the country’s congress approves legislation specifically dealing with LGBT discrimination.

- paying the bills -

The court’s judges have said the ruling was to address an omission that had left the LGBT community legally unprotected.

“In a discriminatory society like the one we live in, the homosexual is different and the transsexual is different. Every preconception is violence, but some impose more suffering than others,” said justice Carmen Lucia.

Justice Ricardo Lewandowski, one of the judges who voted against the measure, recognized the lack of congressional legislation on the issue but said he voted against putting homophobia inside the framework of the racism legislation because only the legislature has the power to create “types of crimes” and set punishments.

While same-sex marriage is legal in Brazil, it is still a dangerous country for members of the LGBT community and has a large evangelical movement often critical of gay rights. According to the rights group the Grupo Gay da Bahia, 420 LGBT people were killed across Brazil in 2018, while at least 141 have been killed so far this year.

President Jair Bolsonaro, a former army captain who assumed office on Jan. 1, has a history of offensive comments about gays, blacks and other minorities, openly acknowledging he is a homophobe. He has said he would rather have a dead son than a gay son.

- paying the bills -

Related Articles

Brazil: Rio postpones Carnival over coronavirus

(Q24N) Rio de Janeiro's world-famous Carnival parade will not take place...

Copa Airlines plan to restart some flights in mid August include Costa Rica

(Q TRAVEL) Copa Airlines, the flag carrier of Panama, said on...

MOST READ

COVID-19 Costa Rica: country exceeds70,000 infections; ensures participation in the COVAX-facility

(QCOSTARICA) Costa Rica on Friday reached 70,816 confirmed cases of COVID-19, after adding 1,357 new cases over the previous day. 595 people are hospitalized, 237...

What Is Sports Betting Like In Costa Rica?

Sports betting is a fun way to feel like you are a part of the game. However, not every country allows gamblers to bet...

12 years in jail for minor for participating in murder of Karolay Serrano

(QCOSTARICA) The cry for justice for the murder of Karolay Serrano Cordero, 26, was heard Monday afternoon, September 21, in the courts of Heredia,...

Allison Bonilla case: OIJ did not find anything in an alleged grave located by the search team

(QCOSTARICA) An inspection with a dog trained to detect human remains, allowed the Judicial Investigation Agency (OIJ) to rule out finding the remains of...

Blame the drivers: It’s not the posts, but the lack of road safety education

(QCOSTARICA) The installment of the flexible delineator folding posts on the Ruta 32, at a cost of ¢177 million colones Sunday morning is failing...

Harllan Hoepelmann is the first legislator to be diagnosed positive

(QCOSTARICA) Legislator Harllan Hoepelman, of the Nueva República, is the first legislator to test positive for COVID-19, as published this Friday morning by the...

Let's Keep This Going!

To be updated with all the latest news and information about Costa Rica and Latin America.

Log In

Forgot password?

Forgot password?

Enter your account data and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Your password reset link appears to be invalid or expired.

Log in

Privacy Policy

Add to Collection

No Collections

Here you'll find all collections you've created before.