Thursday, 4 June 2020

Costa Rica Consumers Will Have To Pay The VAT On Cross-border Services

Starting July 1, consumers in Costa Rica will have to start paying the 13% Value Added Tax on online purchases such as Netflix, Uber, Airbnb, YouTube Premium, Spotify, and many others

Sounds like something very technological. The words ‘cross-border services’ (servicios transfronterizos in Spanish) in the coming weeks will begin to impact the pockets of consumers in Costa Rica.

‘Servicios transfronterizos’ is the category by tax authorities that includes services such as Uber, Spotify, YouTube Premium, Airbnb, Netflix and many others, together with other virtual systems widely used across the planet, subject to the Value Added Tax (VAT) – Impuesto al Valor Agregado (IVA) in Spanish – that goes into effect on July 1.

The 13% sales tax on these services is called for in the plan fiscal (tax plan) – Law 9635 – which stipulates that digital, telecommunications, radio and television services that are provided in the country regardless of the medium or technological platform from which such service is provided, will be subject to the tax.

- paying the bills -

See also Internet Purchases Would Pay Double Tax, If Proposed Tax Reform Approved

The VAT on the import of services is contained in Article 30 of the Law (digital cross-border transactions, when a foreigner makes available to the local consumer access to content through a digital platform).

The Directorate General of Direct Taxation of the Ministry of Finance (Dirección General de Tributación Directa del Ministerio de Hacienda) confirmed, by way of a letter sent on May 17 to a group of taxi drivers, that the 13% VAT will be charged to Uber users in the country and “will be the financial institutions that issue the Costa Rican cards who will act as agents of tax collection”. That is, when a transaction of this type is made, the issuing bank must withhold the tax and remit to the tax authorities.

The law makes no distinction of the location of the origin of the service provider.

“They (by order of tax authorities) what they do is charge the card (credit or debit card) that is used to subscribe and make a monthly, quarterly or biannual charge depending on the selected payment conditions. The idea is that whenever the content providers charge our card, the issuer will be instructed to withhold the 13%, which is the VAT rate of the service that is being paid,” explained Mario Hidalgo tax and legal manager Grant Thornton Costa Rica consultants.

There are gaps

- paying the bills -

According to experts in the matter, the mechanics to specify the collection could have gaps that must be resolved by the issuers of the cards (banks or financial institutions).

The banks or financial institutions say they do not have the tools or technologies to differentiate the purchases made by the user with the card.

Then there is the question of how the VAT will be charged, for example, to a Uber user who pays in cash, which the ride app allows.

The law does allow a “transition” where the application of the VAT is suspended until a special resolution is issued to the specific case.

The case of Uber

Taxi drivers in protest against Uber in the country

Gilbert Ureña, representative of the Foro Nacional de Taxistas (taxi union), indicated that VAT regulates services and platforms, but believes that if the Ministry of Finance charges the 13% on Uber’s services, it (Finance) would commit an anomaly because it Uber is an illegal service in the country.

- paying the bills --

“If the Treasury charges VAT to illegal services such as Uber, 48 hours later, the lawsuit will be filed against the Finance Minister (Rocío Aguilar) and the Director of Direct Taxation (Carlos Vargas) before the Prosecutor’s Office for allowing the collection of taxes in an illegal service”, said the leader of the taxi union.

Last month, during a hearing before the Legislative Assembly – representatives of Uber confirmed that starting in July the VAT would be collected on each trip as stipulated in the Law. However, days later, the Minstry of Finance said it will not collect the tax from Uber.

 

Rico
Ricohttp://www.theqmedia.com
"Rico" is the crazy mind behind the Q media websites, a series of online magazines where everything is Q! In these times of new normal, stay at home. Stay safe. Stay healthy.

Related Articles

Uber Costa Rica workers will be affected by the company’s 14% global layoff

(QCOSTARICA) Uber said Wednesday it will lay off 14% of its...

MOST READ

Health Minister admits ‘fatigue’ but announces ‘absolute will to continue working’

(QCOSTARICA) You could see on Friday he lacked the fervor of recent weeks. He looked tired. You could see his exhaustion. Shortly after the...

Pacific Coast and Central Valley under “Yellow” alert

The National Emergency Commission (CNE) has issued a "yellow" alert for the entire Pacific coast (North, Central and South) and the Central Valley due...

Panama construction continues on hold

Due to the health emergency, the Ministry of Health of Panama decided to extend, for the second time and now for 15 days, the...

Foreign truckers will not be tested for covid-19 upon entering the country

As part of the new rules for regional truckers, to resume the flow of cargo across the borders, Costa Rica said it will not...

Costa Rica is second in the region with the most blood donors

Costa Rica is the second country in Central America where there are more blood donors; only surpassed by El Salvador, but the Blood Bank...

39 detained in weekend mega-operations

(QCOSTARICA) During a series of mega-operations over the weekend, mainly in the greater metropolitan area, authorities arrested 39 and seized motorcycles, drugs, and weapons. The...

Let's Keep This Going!

To be updated with all the latest news and information about Costa Rica and Latin America.