Saturday, 24 October 2020

How Violence Against Women Fuels More Crime

Q24N (Insightcrime.org) Across Latin America, the incredibly high levels of violence against women have long been denounced by non-governmental organizations and the media. Ignoring this phenomenon would be dangerous, as this form of violence can help lay the groundwork for criminal behavior, perhaps especially in the next generation of youths.

Women from across Latin America are taking part in worldwide protests against female oppression on this year’s International Women’s Day, March 8. As people march, the regional press has been publishing astonishing statistics that place the gravity of female victimization into context.

Argentina’s La Nación, for example, reports that one woman is killed because of her gender every 29 hours, while 50 sexual attacks occur per day. In Brazil, nearly a third of women over 16 years of age have suffered from physical or verbal abuse in the past year, Folha de São Paulo reported. And over 30 percent of Mexican women in a recent survey said that they had been physically attacked by their former partner.

- Advertisement -

In Latin America, between one-fifth and two-fifths of “ever-partnered women” have been victims of partner violence, with the greatest prevalence being in the Andean region, according to a 2013 study by the World Health Organization (WHO). Furthermore, seven out of the ten countries with the world’s highest female murder rate are in Latin America, a 2015 report found.

InSight Crime Analysis

While gender-related violence is often associated with the home, this phenomenon has also been linked to the prevalence of criminality among youths. Various studies have established a link between a child’s experience of spousal abuse and them later becoming violent offenders, with the caveat that a multitude of factors are involved in youths developing violent traits.

One of the suggested causes is that growing up in an environment of domestic abuse fosters a “belief that violence is an appropriate means of settling conflict,” one such study reads.

But these detrimental effects on children are not limited to physical aggression. Research from 2009 on young adolescents found that psychological abuse between parents or guardians contributed to the development of violence in children, more so than the type of neighborhood the youths lived in, playing violent video games and even witnessing physical abuse against their parents.

- Advertisement -

Furthermore, children who witness spousal abuse are also likely to be victims of violence themselves. And, similarly, these youths are more likely to later engage in crime and antisocial behavior.

This ”violence begets violence” theory can become dangerously cyclical, as witnessing or experiencing abuse as a child could worsen the risk of people perpetrating domestic violence themselves later in life.

Contributing to this cyclicality in Latin America is the fact that organized crime itself fuels aggression against women. Indeed, it could be said that many of the chauvinistic tendencies that lead to domestic violence also facilitate the forced participation of women in organized crime.

In places where females are oppressed, male-dominated power structures are often replicated within criminal organizations. This can lead to women being coerced into carrying out illegal — and dangerous — criminal activities, such as dealing drugs or becoming drug mules.

Article originally appeared on Insightcrime.org and is republished here with permission.

- Advertisement -
Q24N
Q24N
Q24N is an aggregator of news for Latin America. Reports from Mexico to the tip of Chile and Caribbean are sourced for our readers to find all their Latin America news in one place.

Related Articles

Reinas join OIJ to help women who suffer physical and sexual violence

QCOSTARICA - A few months ago, after being in an intense...

The Failure of Socialism: Lessons for Latin America

PANAM POST - The fall of the Berlin Wall on November...

MOST READ

Six former presidents give support to the Government and democratic institutions

QCOSTARICA - Six former presidents of Costa Rica expressed their support for the Government of Carlos Alvarado, the Fuerza Publica (National Police) and the...

Legislator: “There is no prostitution anymore because there is no tourism”

QCOSTARICA - In the middle of the discussion about the project to revive trawling on Thursday, independent legislator Zoila Rosa Volio was very critical...

COVID-19 in Costa Rica: 1,166 new cases for Oct 17

QCOSTARICA - As of October 17, Costa Rica registers 1,166 new cases of COVID-19, of which 299 are by epidemiological link and 867 by...

Now your dog can accompany you to the bank

QCOSTARICA - BAC Credomatic adopted the “pet friendly” policy in Costa Rica, allowing customers to enter any of the bank's branches with their pet. "At...

Aeroméxico once again bringing tourists to Costa Rica

QCOSTARICA - This Sunday morning, minutes after midnight, the Mexican airline Aeroméxico resumed operations at the Juan Santamaría International Airport (SJO) with a first...

Blockade promoter says they are going to face riot police ‘armed’

QCOSTARICA - Former legislator Oscar Campos Chavarría, leader of the self-styled National Rescue Movement, assured this Friday that they are going to organize in...

Let's Keep This Going!

To be updated with all the latest news and information about Costa Rica and Latin America.

Log In

Forgot password?

Forgot password?

Enter your account data and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Your password reset link appears to be invalid or expired.

Log in

Privacy Policy

Add to Collection

No Collections

Here you'll find all collections you've created before.