Saturday 22 January 2022

Six Employers Headed For Labor Court For Non-Payment of “Aguinaldo”

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Domestic employees are one of the sectors where employers fail to pay the Aguinaldo.
Domestic employees are one of the sectors where employers fail to pay the Aguinaldo. Photo: Vivatropical.com

QCOSTARICA – At the end of 2014, the Ministerio de Trabajo (Ministry of Labor) has received 161 complaints by workers of the nonpayment of the Aguinaldo, the year end bonus paid to all salaried employees.

The last day for employers to pay the Aguindaldo is December 20, after which employees can file a complaint, leading to an investigation and possible sanctions against the scrooge employer.

According to Ministry spokesperson, Giovanni Diaz, six companies will be headed to court next week, confirmed by inspectors who found the payment was not made to employees.

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Diaz added that in most cases employers paid employees once contacted by the Ministry, citing an oversight and not an intent to pay.

Most of the complaints come from companies in retail, agriculture, domestic services and security.

If found guilty, employers face a fine equal from one to 23 minimum wages. “The minimum amount is ¢390.000, while the maximum is ¢9 million colones,” confirmed Diaz.

 

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