Thursday 24 June 2021

Tens of thousands march in third strike

Tens of thousands of protesters across Colombia took part in anti-government demonstrations Wednesday during the country’s third general strike in two weeks.

Thousands of people — trade unionists, students, teachers, farmers and indigenous people among them — gathered to dance and sing in Bolivar Square and marched through Bogota to protest right-wing President Ivan Duque’s social and economic policies.

- Advertisement -

“It’s a time for lots of sectors in our country to wake up. The poor are very poor and the rich have everything,” said protester Silvia Torres in Bogota.

Protests largely peaceful

Wednesday’s protests in the capital and in other cities hampered traffic but were largely peaceful, though clashes with police were reported in Cali and Medellin.

Five people have died in connection with the protests that began in mid-November, including an 18-year-old high school student who died from injuries he sustained from being hit by a teargas canister. Some 500 have been injured.

Anti-government protesters march in Cali, Colombia on December 4. Protests have drawn anywhere from hundreds to several thousand people who often bang pots and pans as they demand president Ivan Duque change his policies.

Authorities said the protesters on Wednesday numbered 40,000 nationwide, a marked decline from the 250,000 people who marched on November 21 against alleged government plans to raise the retirement age and decrease the minimum wage for young workers, as well as a funding shortage for education and Duque’s proposed tax reform to lower duties on businesses.

- Advertisement -

“The Colombian people have woken up!” shouted Paola Jiminez, a 41-year-old lawyer taking part in a pot-banging “cacerolazo” demonstration in Bogota. “Colombians are finding it more and more difficult financially,” she said.

A student taking part in one of several peaceful protests in Bogota, who gave his name as Nicolas, held up a banner saying: “The state lies more than my ex.”

An anti-government protester holds a sign reading ‘Down with the Tax Reform’ as they block a bridge in Cali.

Strike leaders keep up pressure on Duque

Strike leaders intend to sustain pressure on conservative President Ivan Duque and his government after they failed to reach a deal to end protests that have carried on for two weeks.

The strike leaders dismissed appeals by President Duque to stop the strike because it was damaging the country’s economy.

The Colombian National Strike Committee met on Tuesday with Duque’s advisers for the first time, but no agreement was reached.

Colombia’s largest union, the Central Union of Workers (CUT) is expected to meet with government representatives on Thursday.

- Advertisement -

Some indication that the demonstrations have caught the attention of lawmakers came earlier this week when legislators changed the most controversial aspects of a proposed labor reform and added new components to a tax bill that would benefit low-income Colombians.

Colombia’s protests are part of a wider wave of unrest sweeping many countries in Latin America where citizens are rising up against presidents across the ideological spectrum.

Article originally appeared on Q Colombia and is republished here with permission.

- Advertisement -

FACT CHECK:
We strive for accuracy in its reports. But if you see something that doesn’t look right, send us an email. The Q reviews and updates its content regularly to ensure it’s accuracy.

Q24N
Q24N is an aggregator of news for Latin America. Reports from Mexico to the tip of Chile and Caribbean are sourced for our readers to find all their Latin America news in one place.

Related Articles

Colombia surpasses 80,000 COVID-19 deaths; ICU’s nearly full

QCOLOMBIA – Confirmed deaths from COVID-19 in Colombia passed 80,000 on...

Why Colombian protesters are taking to the streets

QCOLOMBIA – For the past two weeks, mass protests that started...

MOST READ

Tico tried to enter via San Jose airport with ¢93 million in cash

QCOSTARICA - A Costa Rican tried to enter the country through the Juan Santamaría International - San Jose Airport - with US$153,244 (the equivalent...

Today’s Vehicle Restriction June 22: plates ending in 3 & 4 CANNOT circulate

Today, Tuesday, June 22, plates ending in 3 & 4 CANNOT circulate. The measure is countrywide and applied between 5:00 am and 9:00 pm, save...

Carlos Alvarado: “Don Rodolfo has my confidence”

QCOSTARICA - President Carlos Alvarado said he has all the confidence in his Minister of Public Works and Transport (MOPT, Rodolfo Méndez Mata, and...

Pandemic reinforces the Costa Rica’s attractiveness as a global destination for wellness tourism

QCOSTARICA - The pandemic caused by Covid-19 fuels the strategy of positioning Costa Rica as a world destination to develop wellness tourism, since travelers...

New trends in coffee consumption challenge sector

QCOSTARICA - Changes in consumption habits in terms of times, types of preparation and specialties challenge the coffee sector. Most of the consumers in Costa...

The United States will distribute 55 million vaccines against Covid-19 in Latin America, Africa and Asia

QCOSTARICA - The United States presented on Monday a plan to share 55 million doses of coronavirus vaccines worldwide, with approximately 75% of the...

Weather, friendly locals, cost of living: expats in Mexico, Costa Rica enjoy same things

EXPAT FOCUS (MND) Of course it was no surprise that readers of Mexico News Daily voted Mexico as the No. 1 expat destination in...

Today’s Vehicle Restriction June 19: only “ODDS” can circulate

Today, Saturday, June 19, only vehicles with "ODD" ending plates CAN circulate The measure is countrywide and applied between 5:00 am and 9:00 pm, save...

How to Continue Learning German If You Live in Berlin

Berlin is the place to be: the best parks, cinemas, concerts, and cultural life attract many students every year. COVID-19 has changed the situation...

WANT TO STAY UP TO DATE WITH THE LATEST!

Get our daily newsletter with the latest posts directly in your mailbox. Click on the subscribe and fill out the form. It's that simple!

Article originally appeared on Q Colombia and is republished here with permission.

Log In

Forgot password?

Forgot password?

Enter your account data and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Your password reset link appears to be invalid or expired.

Log in

Privacy Policy

Add to Collection

No Collections

Here you'll find all collections you've created before.