Monday, 1 June 2020

Bolivia: ‘Overwhelming’ evidence of vote rigging

In its final report released on Wednesday, the Organization of American States (OAS) published details of “deliberate” and “malicious” tactics to rig Bolivia’s October election in favor of former President Evo Morales.

A report by the Organization of American States found “malicious manipulation” in favor of Evo Marales in Bolivia’s October presidential polls. The ex-president rejected the rigging allegations as politically motivated

“The audit team detected malicious manipulation of the elections,” the OAS said in its nearly 100-page report.

“Based on the overwhelming evidence, what is possible to say is that there was a series of malicious operations aimed at altering the will expressed at the polls,” it added.

- paying the bills -

The OAS also alleged that a hidden computer server was used during the election to tilt the vote toward Morales.

OAS findings included “deliberate actions to manipulate the result of the election” that make it “impossible to validate” the official results.

Morales rejected the claims, saying the OAS was “in the service of the North American empire.”

Deep divisions

Morales, who was seeking a fourth term as president, claimed a narrow victory in the October 20 election, but opposition parties accused him of rigging the results.

- paying the bills -

The leftist politician resigned on November 10 at the request of his country’s military and fled to Mexico, where he was granted political asylum. After his departure, right-wing senator Jeanine Anez declared herself interim leader and authorized a new ballot that excludes Morales.

After Morales took asylum in Mexico, claiming he had been ousted in a coup, his supporters began protesting in the streets of the capital, La Paz. At least 30 people have died in clashes between protesters and security forces since the election — most of them since Morales resigned from his post.

Analysts say the dispute and resulting civil unrest in Bolivia exposed divisions between indigenous people loyal to Morales, the South American country’s first indigenous president, and its urban middle and upper classes.

Since declaring herself interim president, Anez has taken a number of measures to rewrite Bolivia’s foreign policy. Breaking ties with socialist countries Cuba and Venezuela is one of her major decisions. Last week, the interim government appointed the country’s first ambassador to the United States in 11 years in an attempt to reset ties with Washington.

shs/rt (AFP. Reuters)

Related Articles

I’ll be Back’: Morales Builds Opposition & Prepares MAS for Bolivian Vote

Former Bolivian President Evo Morales has not given up his political...

Opinion: Latin America’s upheaval tips towards chaos

At first glance, the protests in Ecuador, Chile, Bolivia and most...

MOST READ

COVID-19 will hit the developing world’s cities hardest. Here’s why

The COVID-19 pandemic has brought some of the world's wealthiest global cities to their knees. In the current epicenter, New York, roughly one-fifth of...

Whom to believe, hackers or your BCR bank?

(Rico's Digest) “To our great regret, executives, employees, regulators, Visa and Master Card are not interested in the data breach that we talked about...

President Alvarado announces cabinet shakeup

(QCOSTARICA) President Carlos Alvaradothis Thursday announced changes in the ministers of Finance, Communication, and Science and Technology: Rodrigo Chaves, Luis Adrián Salazar and Nancy...

Abandoning ship: 30 Cabinet Minsters Gone in 2 Years

With the latest resignation of three ministers at the same time, the total abandoning the Carlos Alvarado playground is now 30 in his first...

Tourist Ban Extended To June 30

(QCOSTARICA) Costa Rica Health Minister, Daniel Salas, on Friday, announced the extension of the border restrictions for an additional fifteen days, that is, until...

21 new cases of Covid-19 in 24 hours!

Rico's Covid-19 Digest - Without the usual fervor, one could even say "aguevado", the Minister of Health, Daniel Salas, announced that 21 new cases...

Let's Keep This Going!

To be updated with all the latest news and information about Costa Rica and Latin America.