Tuesday 26 October 2021

A New Community Rises in Costa Rica, but Don’t Bring Your Car

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LAS CATALINAS, Costa Rica — Would you relinquish your car to live in paradise? Charles Brewer is betting that you would. In 2006, Mr. Brewer, an Atlanta-based entrepreneur, purchased 1,200 acres fronting the Pacific Ocean in Guanacaste Province, Costa Rica, with the dream of creating a car-free resort town.

Plaza Escondida in Las Catalinas, a car-free resort town in Costa Rica. Photo Pablo Cambronero

“I became interested in walkable towns because I wanted to do something positive for nature,” he said. “But soon I became even more interested in the impact walkable towns have on human health, happiness and well-being.”

Mr. Brewer looked to the contemporary planning movement known as New Urbanism to develop his tropical utopia.

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Read the full article published in the New York Times

New Urbanism, which took root in the late 1970s, gives priority to environmentally conscious design; compact, walkable neighborhoods with human-scale mixed-use structures; and interlacing private and public spaces that increase social interaction.

New Urbanism, which took root in the late 1970s, gives priority to environmentally conscious design; compact, walkable neighborhoods with human-scale mixed-use structures; and interlacing private and public spaces that increase social interaction… continue reading.

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