Tuesday 18 January 2022

Costa Rica’s contagion rate with a slight upward regression

Paying the bills

Latest

The Secrets of Costa Rican Students: How to Improve Your GPA Without Changing Your Lifestyle

Many students strive to have high GPAs to showcase...

Bill to allow outdoor commerce approved in second debate

QCOSTARICA - Outdoor cafés, bars, restaurants and sodas, among...

In 2021, Costa Rica recovered 52% of prepandemic tourism by air

QCOSTARICA - Costa Rica closed 2021 with the arrival...

Turrialba volcano erupts

QCOSTARICA - The Turrialba volcano erupted Monday evening, at...

I still love Costa Rica… even after they chased me out

A little over a year ago, my wife and...

TSE finishes printing the ballots for the elections in Costa Rica

QCOSTARICA - The Tribunal Supremo de Elecciones de Costa...

Volcano eruption in Tonga islands tested reaction capacity in Costa Rica

QCOSTARICA - The National Emergency Commission (Comisión Nacional de...
Paying the bills

Share

QCOSTARICA – The contagion rate of COVID-19 in Costa Rica rose again, after several weeks of registering a downward trend and settling, just seven days ago, at the lowest levels since the end of April.

According to this Wednesday’s report from the Central American Population Center of the University of Costa Rica (CCP-UCR), said indicator stood at 1.03, a value similar to that seen two weeks ago, estimated with the most recent data of October 7, 2020, with a downward trend during the month of September but with a slight upward regression at the end of the month.

- Advertisement -

This estimate corresponds to infections that occurred around Thursday, October 1, since on average 6 days usually elapse between the moment of infection and the confirmatory laboratory report (4 days of incubation plus 2 days of the test).

The R rate to September 1 had been R = 1.14.

The CCP-UCR issues, every Wednesday, a report on how the transmission of the virus that causes the pandemic is behaving.

The contagion rate, also called the R rate, indicates how many people each patient could infect, on average.

If it is equal to 1, each person will make another person sick on average, and this will keep the infection constant. If it is at 2, on average each person will make two more sick and the transmission speed will double.

Ideally, therefore, this figure should be less than 1, which is a sign that the rate of new cases is decreasing.

- Advertisement -

An index of 1.03 means that an individual with the virus could transmit it to 1.03 people on average. Or, viewed another way, 100 people who carry this pathogen could give rise to a generation of 103 cases.

We must take into account that when active cases number in the thousands, as is the case at this time, every 1,000 active cases could mean an average of 1,030 more cases. Even when the difference is not greater, they do represent possible pressures for the health system.

This index does not have to do with the number of cases, but with the transmission speed or the speed with which the virus spreads. Nor does it measure how aggressive it is, but how its movement and evolution is in a certain place.

- Advertisement -

CCP-UCR researchers warn that R is a highly volatile factor and can undergo large changes in a very short time.

- Advertisement -
Paying the bills
Ricohttp://www.theqmedia.com
"Rico" is the crazy mind behind the Q media websites, a series of online magazines where everything is Q! In these times of new normal, stay at home. Stay safe. Stay healthy.

Related Articles

Subscribe to our stories

To be updated with all the latest news, offers and special announcements.

Log In

Forgot password?

Forgot password?

Enter your account data and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Your password reset link appears to be invalid or expired.

Log in

Privacy Policy

Add to Collection

No Collections

Here you'll find all collections you've created before.