Saturday 12 June 2021

When Nicaraguans Emigrate, They Are More Likely To Go To Costa Rica Than The United States

A small crowd gathers outside the Costa Rican consulate in Managua, Nicaragua on Aug. 8, 2014. Most weekdays see scores of Nicaraguans seeking a Costa Rican visa. (Tim Johnson / McClatchy-Tribune)
A small crowd gathers outside the Costa Rican consulate in Managua, Nicaragua on Aug. 8, 2014. Most weekdays see scores of Nicaraguans seeking a Costa Rican visa. (Tim Johnson / McClatchy-Tribune)

COSTA RICA JOURNAL  (LATimes) Nicaragua has many of the same problems as much of Central America. Extreme poverty. Joblessness. Violence, especially against women and children. Government repression.

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Nicaraguans Will Have 90 Day Tourist Visa to Costa Rica Starting This Week.

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[/su_pullquote]And yet, in the latest exodus of Central American minors and others toward the U.S. border, Nicaragua stands apart. The numbers of Nicaraguans heading north are a tiny fraction of the total.

Among the reasons: The brutal gangs that control large swaths of Honduras, El Salvador, Guatemala and Mexico have not been able to gain a foothold in Nicaragua. Also, violent drug traffickers arrived in Nicaragua later than in the rest of the region and were more quickly marginalized. Another reason is simple geography — Nicaragua lies next to the most stable Central American nation, Costa Rica, to which many immigrate for better-paying jobs.

When Nicaraguans emigrate — and many do — they are more likely to go south to Costa Rica or farther south to Panama, where work is relatively plentiful and pays much better, than to the Southwestern United States.

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A man shows his passport with a "visa denied" stamp, outside the Costa Rican consulate in Managua, Nicaragua, where he stood in line for two days. (Esteban Felix / Associated Press)
A man shows his passport with a “visa denied” stamp, outside the Costa Rican consulate in Managua, Nicaragua, where he stood in line for two days. (Esteban Felix / Associated Press)

Daily long lines outside the Costa Rican Consulate in Managua attest to that; visas are a fraction of what a U.S. version would cost: us$32 for Costa Rica and about us$60 to transit Costa Rica to Panama. Some people camp out to ensure a good place in line. There are said to be nearly half a million Nicaraguans living and working in Costa Rica, almost 8% of Nicaragua’s population.

“Undoubtedly, it is safer here than in other parts of the region. But it is also much less safe than before,” said Monica Zalaquett, executive director of the privately run Violence Prevention Center in Managua.

“Homicides are low, but the citizens’ perception is of more robberies, more gun trafficking … more use of drugs like cocaine,” she said.

According to United Nations data, Nicaragua has the second-lowest homicide rate in Central America, after Costa Rica. Eleven homicides per 100,000 in population were reported in 2012, compared with 90 in neighboring Honduras.

Some activists suspect the increasingly authoritarian and closed government of President Daniel Ortega, a former commander of the Sandinista revolutionaries, may be underreporting the statistics. But even so, the contrast with Honduras is startling.

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Nicaragua doesn’t have the most vicious gangs, like Mara Salvatrucha, which controls parts of El Salvador and Honduras and is of late allied with Mexican drug cartels. But it does have smaller ones, with fearsome names like the Dead Eaters and the Dog Killers.

A fundamental reason for the difference has to do with migration patterns over the decades. Most Nicaraguans who went to the United States in the 1980s did so legally because the Reagan administration, fighting the Sandinista government at the time, welcomed refugees presumably fleeing the leftists. Hondurans were also viewed favorably because their country served as an operating base for the U.S.-backed Contra rebels.

Not so for Salvadorans and Guatemalans, fleeing governments that Reagan supported.

Nicaraguans tended to settle in Miami and New Orleans, while Salvadorans went to Los Angeles and were sucked into a booming and bloody gang culture. They would be the first people the U.S. started deporting back to Central America in the early 1990s.

Costa Rica has served as the escape valve, said Jaime Morales, a lawmaker and a former vice president, under Ortega. “All the maids in Costa Rica are nicas,” he said. “All the field hands are nicas.”

Morales said Nicaragua’s stifling heat and a kind of laid-back national character also have tamped down violence. The war, which famously divided families, “ended, and we all went back to a habit of coexistence,” he said. “It’s not a paradise, but it’s a big contrast to El Salvador and Honduras.”

Some Nicaraguans, however, see trouble on the horizon.

A police officer patrols a market during an anti-drug operation in a market street in Managua, Nicaragua. (Esteban Felix / Associated Press)
A police officer patrols a market during an anti-drug operation in a market street in Managua, Nicaragua. (Esteban Felix / Associated Press)

On July 19, assailants with machine guns attacked convoys of Ortega supporters en route to celebrations marking the 35th anniversary of the Sandinista revolution. Five people were killed, more than 20 wounded, and a clear antigovernment message appeared to have been sent.

It was an unusually fierce attack, and so was the military response, according to human rights activists, who say dozens of houses were raided and several people taken away. At least eight will stand trial, though the Ortega government has generally kept the incident cloaked in secrecy.

Some say that is typical of the closed-fisted control Ortega and his main ruling partner, wife Rosario Murillo, exert over Nicaragua.

“The government does not accept that there are other organizations” doing grass-roots work in the communities, Zalaquett, the crime-prevention expert, said. “They want to control everything. They are closing space for civil society, and that’s sad. As civil society is rejected … there will be a lot more violence.”

Click here to read the full article Few Nicaraguans among Central America’s exodus to U.S. by LA Times

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FACT CHECK:
We strive for accuracy in its reports. But if you see something that doesn’t look right, send us an email. The Q reviews and updates its content regularly to ensure it’s accuracy.

Ricohttp://www.theqmedia.com
"Rico" is the crazy mind behind the Q media websites, a series of online magazines where everything is Q! In these times of new normal, stay at home. Stay safe. Stay healthy.

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