Sunday, 12 July 2020

Colombia’s ‘webcam’ models reinvent themselves in the face of pandemic demand boom

Eroticism and sex online are no longer enough. In isolation due to the pandemic, Colombian webcamers now spend more time listening and offering advice of all kinds to clients who do not know how to deal with quarantine.

The demand for its services has not only increased by 30%, according to industry reports but has also diversified due to the new coronavirus.

Now “we are like psychologists for users,” says a 26-year-old webcam model who calls herself Angela Cianuro in this business.

- paying the bills -

COVID-19 “is a topic of conversation and concern for many, and we, therefore, try to help them,” says this tattooed woman with lilac hair. “While you offer something erotic, you also offer them (users) company, a smile, warmth.”

With almost half of humanity quarantined by a virus that has resulted in almost 120,000 deaths, many workers in this sector are currently escaping the collapse of the global economy.

Confined to her Bogota apartment, Cianuro prides herself on using her empathy to counsel unemployed, lonely, and concerned Internet users.

Before compulsory isolation began to rule in Colombia, where there are more than 2,800 infections, Cianuro offered virtual erotic shows for six or seven hours a day.

- paying the bills -

via GIPHY

The work time remains the same, but the routine has changed: now one session of hers carries physical exercises, diet recommendations and economic advice.

“You are human and you don’t want a person to be bad,” adds this single mother of a seven-year-old boy.

Article originally appeared on Q Colombia and is republished here with permission.

Q24N
Q24N
Q24N is an aggregator of news for Latin America. Reports from Mexico to the tip of Chile and Caribbean are sourced for our readers to find all their Latin America news in one place.

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Article originally appeared on Q Colombia and is republished here with permission.